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Wind power in Denmark half price of coal and gas

i Aug 4th No Comments by

denmark

“The cheapest form of new electricity in Denmark will be onshore wind power when new turbines become operational in 2016, according to a new analysis by the country’s government. The price has been estimated to be about one half of what coal and natural gas cost.”

And fracked gas is more expensive than natural gas.

You can read the full article here.

Potential impacts of fracking in Ireland/Northern Ireland discussed

i Aug 3rd No Comments by

A short interview here with a well known investigative journalist from New York (who works freelance for the BBC) who has good experience of the impacts of fracking in the USA.

The film was made by a cross-border group in Ireland, and includes discussion of the impacts on farming in the area.

Fracking around the world, including Germany

i Jul 31st No Comments by

This page summarises the position on fracking in different countries around the world.

Of course, being part of wikipedia, it is always useful to check for other sources.

But until we find those, the excerpt on German policy is highly instructive:

“Massive hydraulic fracturing of gas wells in tight sandstone began in Germany in 1975, and became common during the period 1978-1985, when more wells received massive hydraulic fracs in Germany than in any other European country. Germany also had the largest hydraulic fracturing jobs in Europe, using up to 650 tonnes of proppant per well. Most German fracs used water- or oil-based gels.[22] The most popular target formation for hydraulic fracturing was the Rotliegend Sandstone. Hydraulically fractured wells are today the source of most of German natural gas production.[23]

“In February 2013, the government of Chancellor Angela Merkel announced draft regulations that would allow for the exploitation of shale gas deposits using the same fracking techniques common in the U.S., with the exception only of wetland areas that make up just over 10% of German territory. The draft legislation had come from the Federal Department of Economics, then headed by the party head ofMerkels coalition partner, the pro-business free Democracts.[24] This policy was said to be motivated by fears that consistently high energy costs were harming German industry, facing competitors for example from the U.S. where energy prices had shrunk to less than 25% of German energy costs.[25]

“However these plans immediately drew massive critique both from opposition parties and elements of Merkel’s own CDU, as well as from major NGOs, large parts of the press and the general public. Within less than a month, the original plan was put on ice for the foreseeable future and a moratorium was declared. Ever since shale gas fracking has de facto been banned in Germany and the stance of the newly formed Grand Coalition government expressed in the coalition treaty is that unconventional gas exploration will not be pursued in the country under this government. Here is an excerpt from the coalition contract:[26] (more…)

Germany bans fracking for seven years

i Jul 22nd No Comments by

“There won’t be [shale gas] fracking in Germany for the foreseeable future,” German Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks. “Protecting drinking water and health has the highest value for us.

Source: Wall St Journal/ The Australian

France has also repeatedly banned fracking. Source BBC