Four more reports on fracking

i Mar 31st No Comments by

The recently published Medact report on the health impacts of fracking mentions that “There are now over 450 peer-reviewed publications in this
field, consisting of studies, reviews and commentaries. “

Some of the key ones are the December 2014 review of evidence by the New York State Department of Health (already published on this site), plus four other reports not seen here before:

The evidence is very, very clear.

Anybody who ignores it is either:

a) unintelligent, or
b) lying, and
c) doesn’t care about the health of the people or the other negative impacts, which are now very well known and well documented.

Chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing

i Mar 24th No Comments by

In 2011 the US House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce asked 14 leading oil and gas service companies to disclose the types and volumes of the hydraulic fracturing products they used in their fracking fluids between 2005 and 2009.

The resulting report can be accessed here.

The relevant extract from the Executive Summary reads [emphasis added]:

“Between 2005 and 2009, the 14 oil and gas service companies used more than 2,500 hydraulic fracturing products containing 750 chemicals and other components. Overall, these companies used 780 million gallons of hydraulic fracturing products – not including water added at the well site – between 2005 and 2009.

Some of the components used in the hydraulic fracturing products were common and generally harmless, such as salt and citric acid [though do you want these added to your groundwater?]. Some were unexpected, such as instant coffee and walnut hulls. And some were extremely toxic, such as benzene and lead.



The most widely used chemical in hydraulic fracturing during this time period, as measured by the number of compounds containing the chemical, was methanol. Methanol, which was used in 342 hydraulic fracturing products, is a hazardous air pollutant and is on the candidate list for potential regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act.



“Between 2005 and 2009, the oil and gas service companies used hydraulic fracturing products containing 29 chemicals that are (1) known or possible human carcinogens, (2) regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act for their risks to human health, or (3) listed as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act. These 29 chemicals were components of more than 650 different products used in hydraulic fracturing.



“The BTEX compounds – benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene – appeared in 60 of the hydraulic fracturing products used between 2005 and 2009. Each BTEX compound is a regulated contaminant under the Safe Drinking Water Act and a hazardous air pollutant under the Clean Air Act. Benzene also is a known human carcinogen. The hydraulic fracturing companies injected 11.4 million gallons of products containing at least one BTEX chemical over the five year period.

“In many instances, the oil and gas service companies were unable to provide the Committee with a complete chemical makeup of the hydraulic fracturing fluids they used. Between 2005 and 2009, the companies used 94 million gallons of 279 products that contained at least one chemical or component that the manufacturers deemed proprietary or a trade secret. Committee staff requested that these companies disclose this proprietary information. Although some companies did provide information about these proprietary fluids, in most cases the companies stated that they did not have access to proprietary information about products they purchased “off the shelf” from chemical suppliers. In these cases, the companies are injecting fluids containing chemicals that they themselves cannot identify. “

Cornell University engineer on Fracking

i Aug 14th No Comments by

In this short talk, Dr Anthony Ingraffea of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department of Cornell University talks about:

  • why fracking is not a “60 year old tried and tested” technology
  • how pretty much all wells leak within a few years, and why this is
  • how fracked gas is not a ‘clean’ fossil fuel: in fact it is dirtier than coal

In his talks he also recommends the following two sites as sources of reliable, fact-led information about fracking:

http://www.earthworksaction.org/reform_governments/oil_gas_accountability_project

http://www.psehealthyenergy.org/

Experts reject economic boost of shale, insist jobs could be lost

i Aug 6th No Comments by

“Experts’ report rejects economic boost of shale and insists jobs could be lost.”
fracking-drill

“Research by US and British scientists and medics warns fracking could unleash health and environmental disasters while failing to deliver the promised economic boom.”

The experts warn of “potentially lasting damage to tourism and agriculture while bringing only short-term jobs and doing little to cut long-term energy costs.”

Each report “makes for uncomfortable reading for anyone living near a potential fracking site.”

Source: Daily Mirror

You can read the full original reports also on our website, here and here.